Chemistry Teacher with Students in Class
Many graduate students want to learn how to teach, but many of them may not have the opportunity to do so while enrolled in graduate school.  The Fundamentals in Teaching (FIT) workshop series is designed to provide training and support for all graduate students who are interested in learning the basic concepts of teaching. FIT is part of The Graduate School’s Preparing Future Leaders initiative to promote and provide opportunities for graduate students to learn transferable skills to make them more competitive in the global market.

Participants choose a from an array of workshops that meets their professional goals. Workshops are also applicable to postdocs and faculty members who want to learn new information about teaching in the college classroom. Teaching experience is not required, and participants can complete as many workshops as they choose based on their own needs and interests. Workshops are available both online and in person throughout the academic year. A list of all FIT Workshops can be found below. 

A different series of workshops is offered every semester. While all of these workshops are not available this semester, they will be offered again in the future! Keep an eye on our registration system and watch for upcoming FIT workshop schedules. To see the difference between FIT and our other teaching programs, take a look at this grid.

Introduction to Teaching

  • The Introduction to Teaching workshop is offered multiple times every semester to allow opportunities for participants to learn basic skills in lesson planning, course organization, active learning techniques, and assessment strategies related to effective teaching.  You may take the FIT workshops in any order, although this workshop is a great place to start.  Note: This workshop is required for all CoAT participants and CITT participants.

Core Fundamentals:

Advanced Strategies:

Special Topics:

Your Teaching Philosophy and Portfolio:

Introduction to Teaching

The Introduction to Teaching workshop is offered multiple times every semester to allow opportunities for participants to learn basic skills in lesson planning, course organization, active learning techniques, and assessment strategies related to effective teaching.  You may take the FIT workshops in any order, although this workshop is a great place to start.  Note: This workshop is required for all CoAT participants and CITT participants.

Active Learning:  An Introduction


Format: Offered both in person and online (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length:  2 hours
Description:  Active learning can engage students, enhance learning, and create an exciting classroom environment.  In this workshop, participants will explore a variety of active learning strategies that can be used in any classroom or lab setting.  We will identify define, identify, and practice several active learning strategies, and we will address some of the challenges of using active learning in the classroom.

Outcomes:  After this workshop, participants will be able to:
-define active learning
-compare and contrast active vs. passive learning
-practice and evaluate a variety of active learning techniques
-identify ways to establish a classroom environment that supports active learning
-develop one active learning strategy
-assess active learning strategies to aid in continued improvement and refinement

Advising as Teaching

Format: In person
Length: 1.5 hours

Description: This workshop will challenge participants to re-imagine advising as teaching–an activity that requires organization, engagement, and follow-through, just as teaching in the classroom does. The workshop will address the qualities of the best advisors according to NACADA, the National Academic Advising Association. Participants will practice simulated advising scenarios and will critique example advising syllabi, leaving with an abundance of advising resources.

Outcomes:  After this workshop, participants will be able to:
– articulate at least five similarities between academic advising and teaching undergraduate students

– know the four steps for conducting an advising session that is pedagogical in nature and be able to practice those steps

– know similarities between an advising syllabus and a course syllabus

– find additional online resources regarding faculty advising

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Format: In person
Length: 2 hours + 1.5 hours (2 – Part Workshop)

Communication is one of the most important aspects of science. How you communicate depends on whether you are publishing research results in a peer-reviewed journal, talking to a reporter, interacting with students, or discussing your research with the public. It depends, in short, on audience. In this two-part workshop, you will blend different photography techniques, communication skills, and knowledge of your research to photograph your “craft” for various audiences.

Outcomes: After completing this workshop participants will be able to:

– use several different photographic techniques

– articulate the factors to consider when conveying research to different audiences

– explain their research succinctly to a variety of audiences using art as a medium

Assisting Students in Distress


Format: In person
Length: 2 hours
Description: This workshop will focus on trends in college student mental health, common causes of distress and signs and symptoms of emotional distress. The program will address academic interventions vs. accommodations and the importance of boundaries when working with students. We will identify types of psychological crises and your role in providing intervention. This will include some focus on suicide prevention/awareness efforts on our campus. Campus resources will be identified as well as specific strategies for referral of student distress as well as student crisis.

Outcomes: After completing this workshop participants will be able to:
Identify common causes, signs and symptoms of distress.
Discern the difference between distress and crisis and know how to proceed accordingly.
Know campus resources and how to access them directly.
Intervene with a student regarding academic distress that is associated with mental health concerns.

Classroom Assessment Techniques

Format:  Offered both in person and online (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length:  2 hours
Description:  Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are strategies to quickly assess student learning and provide feedback.  In this workshop, participants will discuss, practice, and share a variety of approaches for assessing students’ learning.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-define classroom assessment techniques
-discuss the benefits and challenges of using CATs
-explain and identify several CATs that can be applied in their classrooms
-practice the CAT as both a teacher and as a student

Classroom Management


Format:  Offered both in person and online (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length:  2 hours
Description:  Managing the classroom environment is one of the most challenging aspects of teaching.  This workshop is designed to address classroom management issues and concerns.  Topics will include:  creating a welcoming environment, establishing guidelines and expectations, maintaining professionalism, and handling disruptive students.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-explain the importance of managing a learning environment
-compare today’s learning environment with your own past experiences
-discuss how to establish guidelines, expectations, and rules
-discuss non-confrontational ways of dealing with classroom issues
-share and practice managing classroom situations

Collaborative Learning and Group Work


Format:  In person
Length:  2 hours
Description:  Collaborative learning environments have become the norm in many academic settings, but the process of managing group work and group projects can become challenging for instructors at all levels. This workshop is designed to address some of the common challenges of group work and to explore strategies for designing effective collaborative learning experiences for you and your students.

Outcomes: After this workshop, participants will be able to:
-compare the pros and cons of group work and collaborative learning
-discuss ways to overcome barriers and challenges in group work
-discuss strategies to design effective group projects
-explore ways to manage group work and keep team members on task
-discuss tools for evaluation and grading group work vs. individual contributions

Controversy in the Classroom

Format: In person
Length: 2 hours
Description: One of the most attractive parts of teaching in a university setting can also be one of the most daunting:  controversy. This workshop will explore what it means to teach controversial topics and how to turn these moments of conflict into positive learning experiences.  Dr. Rhonda Sutton, the current Director of the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs and adjunct assistant professor in Counselor Education, will lead this workshop. Prior to forming the postdoc office, Dr. Sutton served as the Assistant Vice Provost for the Office of Equal Opportunity at NC State where she discussed controversial issues with the campus community, formed campus policy, and conducted training opportunities on conflict resolution in academic environments.

Outcomes: After this workshop, participants will be able to:
-distinguish the rights and responsibilities of students and faculty in regards to the pursuit of academic goals
-identify laws associated with first amendment rights, freedom of speech and unlawful harassment
-recognize proactive measures one can take to handle controversy both inside and outside the classroom

Creating Engaging Visuals for Teaching and Learning


Format: Available online on demand all year; registration not required
Length: approximately 2 hours
Description:  Everyone has experienced it, if not guilty of it: Death by PowerPoint. Most college instructors will agree that it is imperative to include a visual aid to supplement a lecture and reach visual learners, but what happens when these “visual” aids include as much text as your lecture notes? How can we incorporate visuals that enhance, rather than detract from or confuse the message? What should these visuals look like? In this workshop, you will learn why visuals are important for the learning process, what type of technologies you can use to create visuals, and some guidelines for creating presentations, handouts, and visual thinking tools to enhance your course and engage more learners. This workshop consists of one interactive presentation, one reading, and one activity. You MUST complete all activities to receive credit. Visit the PFL On-Demand site to attend.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-define visual learning and list some benefits to incorporating visual teaching strategies into your classroom.
-identify (both low- and high-tech) tools for creating visuals for classroom use.
-describe different ways in which visuals can be effectively incorporated into lectures or student activities.
-design an effective visual tool (a study tool, visual presentation, or handout) describing three main points learned in this workshop.

Creating a Healthy Learning Environment

Format: In Person
Length: 2 hours
Description: When you plan a course or a lesson, one of the fundamental pieces to consider is the type of learning environment you want to create. The learning environment is a dynamic space where students and instructors connect, share ideas, and learn from each other. Most instructors want to create a healthy environment that allows for discussion, enhances engagement, and welcomes all types of learners. But how do you create that? In this workshop, we’ll compare different types of learning environments and analyze strategies to help you create a healthy environment for both you and your students.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
-compare and contrastdifferent types of learning environments
-analyze strategies to create a healthy learning environment
-share ideas and strategies to enhance the overall learning experience

Creating Plagiarism-Proof Assignments

Format: In-Person

Length: 2 hours

Description: In the context of increasing concern about plagiarism—and increasingly questionable practices for dealing with it—this workshop will focus on productive ways to design writing assignments that restore our roles as guides to our student learning and make it very difficult or even impossible for student to commit plagiarism. We will also consider ways to teach skills for the use and attribution of sources in specific fields, and distinguish lapses in these skills (and the resulting muddled or inappropriate documentation) from real plagiarism.

Creating Tests that Assess Higher Order Thinking Skills 

Format:  Online  (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length: 2 hours
Description: This workshop is a partnership between The Graduate School and Innovative Educators. There are NO COSTS for workshop participants from NC State. The workshop will include a pre-recorded presentation by Dr. Jennifer Hurd followed by online discussions facilitated by Dr. Barbi Honeycutt. The workshop presentation will begin with an overview of Bloom’s Taxonomy, and then we will look at writing test questions that will assess more than knowledge and comprehension. Different types of questions will be covered. Advantages and disadvantages of each type of question will also be presented. Workshop participants will be able to analyze questions developed by other instructors and practice writing test items.

Outcomes: After this workshop, participants will be able to:
-Write different types of questions that will assess more than knowledge and comprehension on the Bloom’s Taxonomy Scale.
-Analyze test items to determine if these test items assess higher order thinking skills.
-Avoid signaling the correct answer by knowing common errors in teacher-developed exams.

Current Issues in Teaching Reading Group

The Current Issues in Teaching Reading Group is three-part series where graduate students with an interest in teaching come together to discuss scholarly articles related to research in teaching. In the spring, participants will meet during lunch once in January, February, and March. The Reading Group is designed to build on the skills introduced in the Fundamentals in Teaching workshops, offering students and post-docs the chance to critically analyze the current research in the field. NOTE: If you want to count the reading group towards CoAT, you must attend at least 2 of the reading group sessions.

Examples of relevant topics that have been discussed:
* Case studies of pedagogical strategies applied in the classroom
* Experimental evaluation of assessment techniques
* Educational/Instructional technology
* Teaching in an online or blended environment
* Developing teaching skills in young/future faculty

This Spring, we will focus on discussing research related to Social Learning and Gamification in Learning. This may include topics such as applying social media in the classroom, helping students build personal learning environments, or using game-like incentives in addition to grading.

These are tentative topics, as in each meeting, a member of the group selects a recent scholarly article related to the theme and prepares a short (15 minute) presentation of the key points. Afterwards, the presenter facilitates a discussion around the article, where participants are expected to compare the points raised to their own teaching experiences, challenge the author’s approaches and theories with counterexamples, and discuss practical ways to implement the theory in routine teaching or lesson planning.

To learn more about the group or how to participate, please contact Barry Peddycord, PFL Ambassador, <bwpeddyc@ncsu.edu>.

Effective Classroom Discussions

Format: Hybrid (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length:  1 hour + online component
Description: When implemented well, class discussion can help build high level thinking skills and keep students engaged in the course material. However, turning over the classroom to the students can be intimidating for many instructors. In this hybrid workshop, we will discuss the values of using discussion in the classroom, best uses of discussion, establishing goals for the conversation, and develop discussion-generating classroom activities.

Outcomes: After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-Discuss the benefits of discussion based lessons
-Develop strategies for goal focused classroom discussion
-Design appropriate assessment tools and strategies to evaluate students on the discussed content
-Brainstorm methods to overcome pitfalls in conversation

Effective Questioning Techniques

Format: Offered both in person and online (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length: 2 hours
Description: “Are there any questions?” How many times have you asked this question only to receive blank stares from your students? Learning to ask effective questions is an essential skill for every teacher, regardless of the type of classroom environment. In this workshop, participants will explore strategies and techniques for asking questions effectively to generate more student participation. We will discuss word choice, timing, types of questions, and overall presentation style.

Outcomes: After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-compare and contrast effective vs. ineffective questioning strategies
-apply specific tools to generate effective questions
-discuss how to address inaccurate responses
-identify different types of questions
-discuss presentation strategies to engage your audience

Emotional Intelligence: A Tool for Teaching

Format:  In person
Length:  2 hours
Description:   You might know your IQ, but are you aware of emotional intelligence and what this concept comprises? This workshop will introduce you to the core elements of emotional intelligence. Information will also be provided that will help you gain an awareness of how you can use these elements of emotional intelligence to improve your interactions with your students and your competency as a teacher.

Outcomes: After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-describe the different dimensions and domains of emotional intelligence
-identify aspects of emotional intelligence they wish to improve
-discover how emotional intelligence can increase their competency as a teacher

Followup to Valerie Young: Empowering Your Colleagues to Overcome the Imposter Syndrome

Format: In person

Length: 2 hours

Description:

This workshop will be an extension of Dr. Valerie Young’s workshop on the Imposter Syndrome. As a future leader in academia or industry (faculty, administrators, supervisors, etc.) there is a real chance that we may lead or work with others who may experience feeling like an imposter. During this workshop, participants will work collaboratively to come up with strategic ways to assist and empower these individuals that you may one day supervise or work with using the knowledge gained from Dr. Young’s workshop.

Outcomes:  After this workshop, participants will be able to:

– apply strategies to lead employees, students, and other supervisees dealing with imposter syndrome

– share strategies to help themselves navigate feelings of being an imposter; and

– reflect and analyze information learned in Dr. Young’s workshop.

Engaging Students:  An Introduction to Using Games in the Classroom

Format: In person
Length:  2 hours
Description:  One way to engage students is to introduce an educational game into your classroom.  Games can be designed to address a variety of course goals and objectives, and games can provide a fun, interactive learning environment to add creativity to the classroom.  This interactive workshop will introduce you to the gaming experience in the classroom environment.  Participants will play games and then reflect upon the purpose, design, and generalization to other contexts.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-identify how games can be designed to address course goals and objectives
-explain the basic elements of constructing an educational game
-compare and contrast the benefits and challenges of games as a teaching strategy
-adapt an existing game to your classroom
-reflect upon the purpose, design, and generalization to other contexts

Establishing Credibility and Authority in the Classroom

Format: In person
Length:  2 hours
Description:  For new instructors and graduate teaching assistants, it can be challenging to establish credibility and authority in the classroom.  In this workshop, we will discuss how instructor credibility and legitimacy is established or lost and explore ways to respond to subtle and direct challenges to your authority. We will discuss how to change an environment once this type of challenge has occurred so you and your students can refocus and re-establish stability in the classroom.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-recognize challenges to authority
-discuss techniques to respond to challenges to authority
-discuss ways to convey credibility and legitimacy
-explore strategies for readjusting the classroom climate
-develop ways to avoid and defuse a “feeding frenzy

Evaluation and Grading: An Introduction

Format: Offered in person and online (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length:  2 hours
Description:  The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with an introduction to different grading and evaluation processes in teaching.  Participants will practice creating a rubric and designing an evaluation process for their own course. Participants will also discuss best practices for grading and evaluation. This workshop is recommended for those who have limited grading experience.  For those who have more experience grading, this workshop provides the foundation for more advanced workshops such as:  Integrating Audio Feedback: How to use Audacity for Grading and Evaluation or Responding to Student Writing

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-discuss the different types of grading rubrics
-compare the pros and cons of rubric
-practice creating a rubric for an an assignment
-practice giving constructive feedback
-discuss best practices in grading and evaluation

The Faculty Interview: Preparing for Your Teaching Demonstration

Format:  In person
Length: 2 hours
Description:  If you plan to apply for a faculty position, you will most likely be asked to teach a class during your campus interview. How you will establish rapport with students you’ve never met?  How will you decide which teaching strategies to use?  How will you demonstrate your effectiveness as a teacher when you only have one chance to impress the committee?  How will you establish your credibility and authenticity while managing your nervousness?  In this workshop, we will explore the answers to these questions to help you effectively prepare for the teaching demonstration part of your interview.

Outcomes: After this workshop, participants will be able to:
-Identify ways to establish rapport with a new group of students.
-Discuss the do’s and don’ts of choosing the appropriate teaching strategies to demonstrate during a faculty interview.
-Describe the best ways to make a positive impression to help the committee members see you as a colleague.
-Discuss ways to manage your nerves and present your best “teaching self” to the committee members and the students.

FIT: Teaching on the First Day: Creating an Effective Learning Environment

Format: On Demand
Description: First impressions are important, and the first day of class is no exception. This workshop will offer ideas for designing a first day that moves beyond reviewing syllabus logistics and focuses instead on creating an environment that supports the larger goals of your course. You will explore strategies for sparking interest in course material, building a sense of class community and participation, and opening channels of communication with students.

Outcomes: After this workshop, students will be able to:
– Discuss the importance of engaging students on the first day
– Identify course elements or teaching methods that should be highlighted on the first day
– Compare strategies for building community and participation in a class of students who may not know one another
– Build a plan for the first day of a university course

Helping Students Organize Their Knowledge – What a Concept!

Format: Blended (see description)
Length:  2 hours total (1 hour online, 1 hour in person)
Description:  It is important for instructors to help students organize their knowledge and make sense of course material.  One way to do this is through the use of concept maps.  Concept maps are excellent tools for organizing information, showing processes and relationships, and making connections between course concepts.  Concept maps are excellent tools for all learners, but they are especially helpful for visual learners who construct knowledge through graphics, images, pictures and diagrams.  This 3-part workshop includes: Part 1 – Complete the reading “How Does the Way Students Organize Knowledge Affect Their Learning?”, Part 2 – Attend the in person discussion session, and Part 3 – Create a concept map, share it online, and provide feedback to your peers.  Participants will leave the workshop will at least one online resource to help develop concept maps.

Learning outcomes:  After this workshop, participants will be able to:
– describe the functionality of concept maps
– discuss the advantages (and disadvantages) of using concept maps
– create concept maps tailored to their courses
– teach their students how to develop concept maps

Incorporating Active Learning Strategies Into Your Online Teaching Environment

Format: Online (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length: 2 hours
Description: Incorporating active learning strategies into your online teaching environment will increase retention of information. But facilitating an online course involves more than just teaching, building community is also essential. Participants in this session will learn teaching strategies and techniques to create an online learning environment that actively engages their learners and creates a sense of community. This workshop is a partnership between The Graduate School and Innovative Educators. There are NO COSTS for workshop participants from NC State. The workshop will include a pre-recorded presentation by Debra Runshe followed by online discussions facilitated by Dr. Barbi Honeycutt.

Outcomes: After this workshop, participants will be able to:
– articulate a rationale for using active learning in the online environment
– identify techniques to create a sense of community in their online learning environment.
– describe instructional methods that encourage active learning in the online environment.

Integrating Audio Feedback: How to use Audacity for Grading and Evaluation

Format: Online (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length:  2 hours
Description:  This online workshop focuses on Audacity, a free audio recording and editing software program available to Mac and Windows users, as a tool for instructors interested in providing auditory feedback during the grading and evaluation process. Participants will be invited to review graded assignments that are paired with audio feedback (created using the Audacity tool). Additionally, participants will watch instructional videos that demonstrate how the tool works; afterward, participants will create and evaluate their own recording. Discussions will focus on the pros and cons of this tool, and there will be a summary of tips on how to be a more efficient grader through audio feedback. Finally, resource materials will be given to help participants mold their own future assignments in a way that encouraged audio feedback as the tool for grading.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-define the concept of “audio feedback” as a grading and evaluation tool
-record, edit, save, and export audio feedback with the Audacity tool
-explore ways in which this tool can be used to enhance pedagogical practices related to grading and evaluation
-compare pros and cons of audio feedback, considering disability/accessibility requirements, for grading and evaluation
-discuss the method for introducing students to this feedback method
-develop a plan for integrating audio feedback into an assignment

Integrating Writing in the STEM Classroom

Format: in person
Length: 2 hours

Description: Many outside the STEM disciplines (and even some inside it) are surprised to learn that writing is a critical part of being a scientist or engineer. Our students, in all disciplines, need to understand the importance of communicating clearly through writing, and they require practice beyond their English 101 experience. Semester-long research papers can be intimidating and time consuming for both teachers and students in STEM disciplines, but there are still ways to incorporate writing into your classroom by using low-stakes writing assignments. In this workshop we will explore the tools you already have in hand to incorporate writing in your classroom. Additionally, we will discuss time-saving ways to evaluate low-stakes writing assignments.

Outcomes: After this workshop, participants will be able to:
-Create and deliver a low-stakes writing assignment
-Evaluate / assess low-stakes student writing
-Demystify the writing process to students
-Implement interactive “Write To Learn” activities in any type of classroom setting

Intercultural Communication in the U.S. Classroom

Format:  In person
Length: 2 hours
Description: The Graduate School and the Office of International Services have partnered to bring you this workshop focused on teaching in the U.S. university classroom.  This workshop is designed to introduce both international and domestic graduate students to effective teaching and learning strategies by exploring cultural differences that sometimes impact teaching and learning effectiveness.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-Describe two expectations U.S. students have about the classroom environment.
-Explore different cultural norms and discuss how they impact the
learning environment.
-Discuss appropriate ways to manage interactions with students.
-Participate in a variety of activities to demonstrate effective
teaching methods.
-Identify at least two additional resources for you to learn more
information about teaching.

Introduction to Teaching – REQUIRED for CoAT Participants

Format: In person
Length:  2 hours
Description:  The Introduction to Teaching workshop is designed to introduce participants to the fundamentals of effective teaching and learning in the university classroom through exploration, application, and reflection.  This workshop is designed to provide basic information about a variety of teaching topics and to offer “best practices” for enhancing teaching and learning in the university classroom.  All CoAT participants must complete this workshop.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-describe the characteristics of effective learning environments
-develop a basic lesson plan including outcomes, learning strategies, and assessment
-begin the process of self-reflection on your teaching, learning, and professional development
-apply the information learned in this workshop to your own teaching experiences

Introduction to the Teaching Portfolio

Format: Available on demand online all year; registration not required
Length:  3-part series; each part should take approximately 2-3 hours to complete.
Description:  This is self-paced online module designed to introduce graduate students to the process of creating a teaching portfolio.   This workshop is part of the CoAT program, but it does not count as one of the six required workshops. Login to Moodle using your Unity ID and password.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-describe what a teaching portfolio is (and is not)
-list reasons why a teaching portfolio is important
-explain the three main components of a teaching portfolio
-generate ideas for materials to include in their own portfolios
-explain the importance of the teaching philosophy
-analyze teaching philosophy statements

Learning Styles

Format:  Offered both in person and online (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length:  2 hours
Description:  There are more than eight different learning styles, and traditional teaching methods only assist in addressing a few of them.  In this workshop, we will discuss the different ways people learn and explore how you can make simple adaptations to your teaching to enhance the learning process.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-explore how your own learning style influences your teaching style
-identify and explain the eight different learning styles
-discuss the importance of considering  different learning styles when developing lesson plans
-discuss and share practical ways to include a variety of strategies to address learning styles in your classroom

Managing Disruptive Classroom Behaviors 

Format:  Online  (Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length: 2 hours
Description: This workshop is a partnership between The Graduate School and Innovative Educators. There are NO COSTS for workshop participants from NC State. The workshop will include a pre-recorded presentation by Dr. Brian Van Brunt from Western Kentucky University.  The online video presentation will be followed by online discussions facilitated by Dr. Barbi Honeycutt. This practical session is designed for new and experienced faculty members who are looking for new tools to manage difficult student situations in their classrooms. The workshop will demonstrate techniques to re-direct, manage and calm the disruptive students. The facilitators will focus on the techniques of motivational interviewing to offer faculty members an underlying theory and clear examples of how to address today’s classroom
problems.

Outcomes: After this workshop, participants will be able to:
-Learn practical skills, theory and examples of how the tools can be applied in their classrooms.
-Effectively work with disruptive students in the classroom setting.
-Explain the basic concepts of motivational enhancement therapy (or motivational interviewing) as applied to the classroom.
-Discuss the dos and don’ts when working with students who are frustrated and unmotivated.
-Learn the importance of establishing early classroom rules and etiquette to “get out ahead” of potential violent and disruptive behaviors.

Motivational Teaching Strategies

Format: Available on demand online all year; registration not required
Length: approximately 2 hours
Description:  This workshop is designed to introduce participants to the concept of motivation in teaching and learning contexts.  We will discuss teaching strategies and instructional behaviors that encourage student motivation and participation, challenge and support students’ learning, and inspire students to perform to the best of their ability. This workshop consists of two readings, one video, and two activities. You MUST complete all activities to receive credit. Visit the PFL On-Demand site to attend.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-define motivation in educational contexts
-explain the importance of motivation in the college classroom
-discuss the concept of “challenge and support”
-discuss a framework for understanding student motivation
-design and share teaching strategies to encourage student motivation

Peer Review and Teaching Practice

Format: In person
Length: 1 1-hour orientation & 3 2-hour peer review / teaching sessions
Description:

This 3-part workshop series offers you an opportunity to practice teaching and get feedback from colleagues in a safe learning environment. Instructors at all levels of experience can benefit from participating in peer review processes, reflecting on teaching strategies, and learning how to offer feedback and resources to a colleague. Many departments require faculty peer reviews as part of reappointment, promotion and tenure processes.

In this series, participants will prepare a 10 minute lesson on a topic within their field that is relevant and understandable to people outside their field. For example, an economist might present a mini-lesson on the law of supply and demand; an electrical engineer might present a mini-lesson on the mechanics of hybrid car batteries. You will be partnered with a colleague and you will use different tools to provide structured feedback.   Afterward, you will receive written peer reviews and a recording of your teaching, so that you can reflect on areas for continued professional development. Participants will be expected to attend 1 one-hour orientation session and all 3 practice sessions.

Learning Outcomes:

After completing this workshop series, participants will be able to:

      • - Create a plan for continued professional development in teaching.
        – Practice teaching and observation skills.
        – Offer constructive feedback to a colleague.
        – Share teaching strategies and “best practices” with colleagues.
      • To register, email Susanna Klingenberg at FIT-Assistant@ncsu.edu. Registration is first come, first served for 10 participants.

Preparing for an Academic Job Interview

Format:  In person
Length: 2 hours
Description:  Are you interested in applying for an academic position in your field?   Are you interested in being remembered after the interview, and avoiding pitfalls?  Join us as we explore how to not only survive the academic interview process, but thrive as you promote yourself and your scholarship to a potential job opportunity.

Outcomes: After participating in this workshop, participants will be able to:
•Discuss the interview process for academic positions.
•Create a list of questions to ask your interviewers.
•Practice asking and responding to interview questions.
•Determine ‘pitfalls’ of the interview process.
•Identify your professional strengths.

 

Putting Your Teaching Portfolio Online 

Format: In person
Length: 2 hours
Description: It is becoming increasingly common for teaching portfolios to be designed in electronic or online formats. In this workshop, members of the DELTA staff will demonstrate how to use WordPress to create an online teaching portfolio. Participants will view examples of other online portfolios and have opportunities to practice uploading content to begin building their electronic portfolio. Prior web design experience is not necessary. Note: Priority registration is given to students in the Preparing the Professoriate program, participants in the Certificate of Accomplishment in Teaching program, and postdocs in the Certificate in Teaching Techniques program. If seats are available, this workshop will be open to the campus community. Note: This workshop does not count as one of the six required workshops for the CoAT program.

Pre-requisite: Participants should have completed modules 1, 2 and 3 of the “Introduction to the Teaching Portfolio” online workshop before attending this workshop.

Outcomes: After participating in this workshop, participants will be able to:
-build an online teaching portfolio
-compare different portfolio layouts
-guide a reader through the portfolios by creating navigation structures

Revitalizing Your STEM Lab (Blended Workshop)

Format: Hybrid / Blended (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length: 1 hour + online component
Description: As a lab TA, you are often provided with all the materials you need to teach. But are there ways that you can tweak it to make it your own and get your students more excited about science, technology, engineering and math? What changes can you make to align your lab with reformed, research-based principles of learning environments? In this workshop, we will discuss what research teaches us about learning and how you can use it to your advantage to give your students the best lab experience yet. NOTE: This workshop also features an online component

Outcomes:

      • - Describe the five basic components of a reformed classroom environment
      • - Compare and contrast lab activities in terms of their level of inquiry
      • - Constructively critique a current lab you teach
      • - Set three specific goals that will improve the degree of inquiry and reform in your lab

Roadmap to Designing, Implementing, and Evaluating a Service-Learning Project

Format: Hybrid (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length: 1.5 hours + online component
Description: Service-learning is a pedagogy that combines academic content learned in the classroom with service in the community. As more college and universities accept and encourage service-learning, new faculty members will need the skills to implement service-learning projects in their classrooms. This workshop will provide participants with a roadmap for developing a service-learning project and discuss the benefits and challenges of this type of instruction.

Outcomes:
After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
– Explain the difference between service-learning and community service
– Describe 5 steps involved in developing and implementing a service-learning project
– Discuss the benefits and challenges to service-learning
– Develop a service-learning project plan

Designing an Effective Syllabus

Format: In Person
Length: 2 Hours
Description: In this interactive workshop, we examine the ever-important syllabus. Everyone needs one, but not all syllabi are created equal. A poorly designed and written syllabus causes confusion and frustration for both the students and the instructor. By using elements of document design, you can create a syllabus that serves as a tool to guide you and your students through the semester. We will cover tools, strategies, requirements, and creative techniques to help you craft (or re-work) your syllabus for the upcoming semester. Outcomes: After this workshop, participants will be able to:

      1. Identify specific strategies for creating an effective syllabus
      2. Identify tools for creating a syllabus
      3. Create a student-centered syllabus that meets university requirements
      4. Discuss creative approaches to getting students to read and use your syllabus

Responding to Student Writing: Encouraging Reflection and Revision

Format: In person and online
Length: 2 hours
Description: Writing assignments, including essays, lab reports, research papers, or essay test questions, can be great tools to test students’ critical thinking skills and comprehension of the course content.  However, instructors often feel overwhelmed by an abundance of grammatical and organizational problems, and discouraged by the students’ lack of interest in their written feedback. In this workshop we will learn about four types of response, analyze instructor comments on student work, and practice effective response strategies in order to encourage students to use instructor feedback to improve their performance.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-Define, identify, and use corrective, directive, facilitative, and evaluative comments
-Analyze others’ as well as participant’s own comments on student writing
-Develop a response style that mirrors participant’s teaching style and philosophy
-Provide students with feedback that addresses the course objectives and assignment goals and encourages student reflection and/or revision

FIT: Shaping Your Teaching Philosophy: Instruments for Finding Your Identity as a Teacher

Format: In person
Length: 2 hours

Description: How would you describe yourself with a teacher? Would your students say the same about you? Do you experience difficulty when writing/revising your teaching philosophy? This workshop will help participants answer these questions by introducing them to several different inventories that have been developed for characterizing the goals, perspectives, approaches, and styles of all teachers.

Outcomes: After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:

– Identify characteristics of themselves as teachers
– Embrace these characteristics as they teach
– Integrate these characteristics into course design
– Sharpen their teaching philosophy

Social Media in the Classroom and Beyond

Format: In-Person

Length: 2 Hours

Social media is becoming a more ubiquitous part of our online and offline everyday lives. The classroom itself is an inherently social space, and social media can augment the sense of connectedness between students and the course material. This workshop will introduce novel ways that social media has been used in classrooms in other universities, while also taking note of some of the challenges that have to be considered when putting student learning into a public space.
– Create and manage a social media profile
– Compare and contrast the affordances of different platforms
– Apply social media in the classroom or in distance-ed environments
– Utilize social media in my professional career
– Assess legal implications of social media and responsibility to respect students’ privacy

Teaching in the Lab 

Format: In person
Length:  2 hours

Description: For those who teach in lab settings, you know there are many challenges that can impact the teaching and learning process. Whether it’s lab safety concerns, managing students in a lab space, or designing effective activities for labs, we know that teaching in a lab is challenging and rewarding. In this workshop, participants will explore these challenges and address ways to effectively teach in the laboratory setting.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-discuss classroom management issues specific to the laboratory setting
-create effective active learning activities for lab settings
-practice organizing and planning for a lab

Teaching Philosophy Peer Review Workshop


Format:  In person
Length:  1 hour
Description:  Writing your teaching philosophy is one of the most challenging tasks you will do when developing your portfolio.  It is also the most important. After you have completed Parts 1 and 2 of the Introduction to the Teaching Portfolio online module, bring two copies of your teaching philosophy draft to this informal session to work with a peer to develop your best teaching philosophy statement.  This is the perfect opportunity to “field test” your philosophy, receive comments on your draft, and offer constructive feedback to one of your peers.  Note: This workshop does not count as one of the six required workshops for the CoAT program.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-apply feedback from peers to edit and revise their teaching philosophy statement
-offer constructive feedback to others who are writing their teaching philosophy statement
-apply the rubric and guidelines to evaluate the quality of teaching philosophy statements

Effective Teaching With Technology

Format:  In person
Length:  5 hours (1 workshop & a demo session)

Using technology in today’s classroom brings both challenges and new possibilities.  You might wonder – How can it I use it productively?  What tools are available for me to use?  How do I keep technology from being a distraction?  What are best practices in using technology in the classroom?  Come to this interactive workshop and technology sandbox led by the PFL Team, DELTA, and NC State Libraries to learn how to harness these powerful tools and use them effectively in the classroom.

Writing Learning Outcomes

Format: Offered both in person and online (Online workshops are available for one week. Online workshops are self-directed but not self-paced, meaning we will we have deadlines built into the workshop to keep us moving through the discussion forum at the same time. All discussions are asynchronous, meaning you do not have to be online at the same time as your colleagues. You will receive an email 1-2 days before the workshop begins to inform you of the upcoming schedule and how to access the workshop materials.)
Length:  2 hours
Description:  This workshop is designed to introduce participants to the process of writing effective learning outcomes.  As the basis for structured teaching and instruction, learning outcomes help to define teacher expectations for students within the curriculum, and writing learning outcomes is one of the most important steps to take before entering the classroom. In this workshop, we will discuss the importance of learning outcomes in the classroom and learn how to design successful learning outcomes.

Outcomes:  After completing this workshop, participants will be able to:
-define and explain the importance of learning outcomes in teaching and learning.
-define and apply the three domains of learning outcomes
-compare the content-centered method to the learning-centered method as planning tools.
-describe the ABCD method for writing learning outcomes.
-construct a learning outcomes grid that can be used as a tool for planning.